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Author: Law Offices of Mark C. Wagner

The long, ugly history of anti-Asian racism and violence in the U.S.

The long, ugly history of anti-Asian racism and violence in the U.S.By  Gillian Brockell     A gunman killed eight people at three Atlanta-area spas Tuesday night; six of the victims were women of Asian descent, sparking fears among advocacy groups that the killings may have been racially motivated.   Anti-Asian hate crimes have spiked 150 percent since the pandemic began, according to a recent study. Suspect charged with killing 8 in Atlanta-area shootings that targeted Asian-run spas People of Asian descent have been living in the United States for more than 160 years, and have long been the target of bigotry. Here is a look at the violence and racism that Asian immigrants and Asian Americans have faced since before the Civil War. People v. Hall Chinese immigrants began coming to the United States in significant numbers in the 1850s, largely to California and other Western states, to work in mining and railroad construction. There was high demand for these dangerous, low-wage jobs, and Chinese immigrants were willing to fill them. Almost immediately, the racist trope of “Asians coming to steal White jobs” was born. And in 1854, the California Supreme Court reinforced racism against Asian immigrants in People v. Hall, ruling that people of Asian descent could not testify against a White person in court, virtually guaranteeing that Whites could escape punishment for anti-Asian violence. In this case, it was murder: George Hall shot and killed Chinese immigrant Ling Sing, and the testimony of witnesses was rejected because they were also Asian. Chinese massacre […]

As Alabama workers weigh unionization, Amazon says it already offers what unions want

King 5 Article As Alabama workers weigh unionization, Amazon says it already offers what unions want   An Amazon public policy director wouldn’t comment on warehouse workers’ efforts to unionize while praising a study that examined raising the minimum wage. SEATTLE — Amazon offered its support of a study on the benefits of raising the federal minimum wage, but a public policy director wouldn’t explain why the tech giant opposes a move in Alabama to unionize. Voting is underway for about 6,000 employees at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama to decide whether to unionize or not. Mail-in voting started in February and will go on until March 29. In an interview with KING 5 anchor Steve Bunin, Amazon Public Policy Director Jennie Massey said Wednesday she couldn’t comment on the unionization effort in Alabama. “I’m not the best person to speak to that today,” Massey said. “I can tell you that Amazon takes pride in raising our minimum wage to $15 an hour and providing these industry-leading benefits and upscaling opportunities, and that’s what we’re here to talk about today.” Massey told Bunin she would find the “right person” to comment and follow up. Amazon later did reach out to KING 5, and claimed it already offers what the unions are requesting.  “For over 20 years Amazon employees have chosen to maintain a direct relationship with their managers, which may be because Amazon already offers what unions are requesting,” an Amazon spokesperson said Wednesday in a statement. “We’re proud to offer employees industry-leading […]

Occupational safety and health

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Occupational safety and health (OSH), also commonly referred to as occupational health and safety (OHS), occupational health,[1] or occupational safety, is a multidisciplinary field concerned with the safety, health, and welfare of people at occupation. These terms also refer to the goals of this field,[2] so their use in the sense of this article was originally an abbreviation of occupational safety and health program/department etc. The goal of an occupational safety and health program is to foster a safe and healthy occupational environment.[3] OSH also protects all the general public who may be affected by the occupational environment.[4] In common-law jurisdictions, employers have a common law duty to take reasonable care of the safety of their employees.[5] Statute law may, in addition, impose other general duties, introduce specific duties, and create government bodies with powers to regulate occupational safety issues: details of this vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.